The Learning from Practice Manual

Are you involved in student supervision or other ways of helping people learn? If so, Neil Thompson’s The Learning from Practice Manual is for you. Neil has been involved in supporting practice learning for over four decades. This hands-on manual of practice guidance encapsulates his experience and expertise in a way that readers will find very helpful.

Available for purchase along with many other books by Neil here or from the Avenue Learning Centre here.

Connect with Neil Thompson online! For Neil's blog and more resources

Read more

Neil Thompson’s Lesson for Living – Effective communication: Topic and comment

Communication goes awry quite regularly, which is not surprising when you think about how much of it we do in any given day. One common way in which communication breaks down is when what is said (or written) does not cover both topic and comment. The topic is what we are talking about and the comment is what we are saying about it.

They can be articulated separately (‘You know that book on stress I lent you? [topic] I will need it back soon if that’s OK [comment]’) or together (‘Can you please let me have that book on stress I lent you back soon?’). Either is fine when both are covered, but often, there is a topic identified, but it is not clear what the comment is (‘You’ve got my book on stress, haven’t you?’). Is this simply a comment to check that the book is still in their possession or is it an indirect request for it to be returned? It is not clear.

Click here to read more

The Avenue Learning Centre Learning resources from Neil Thompson and colleagues

Read more

Framing toolkit: Talking about poverty

At JRF, we want to inspire action and change to solve UK poverty, but we know there’s a lot of work to do if more people are to understand it and call more loudly for solutions.

To help with this challenge, we’re changing the story we tell about poverty, using framing recommendations from the FrameWorks Institute’s research into public attitudes to poverty in the UK, involving 20,000 people.

Click here to read more

Twitter: Follow Neil Thompson on Twitter

Read more

Connecting care service users with their communities

Paul Williams, who has a mild learning disability, was a champion runner in his youth. After many years in institutional care, however, he rarely mentioned his athletic past. But staff at the south Londoner’s sheltered housing scheme encouraged him to dig out his medals and handwritten race records.

Williams opened up and his confidence grew. Just over a year ago, he gave a motivational talk at a community centre and displayed his medals. He is now working on his life story with a local journalist who volunteers to spend time with Williams.

Williams, his care organisation and volunteer are part of the Time to Connect community inclusion project. This encourages stronger links between people using care services and their neighbourhoods, and ensures they become more active citizens.

Click here to read more

Ensuring every older person is treated with dignity as a unique individual

Read more

Neurodiversity in the workplace

Neurodiversity refers to the different ways the brain can work and interpret information. It highlights that people naturally think about things differently. We have different interests and motivations, and are naturally better at some things and poorer at others.

Most people are neurotypical, meaning that the brain functions and processes information in the way society expects.

However it is estimated that around 1 in 7 people (more than 15% of people in the UK) are neurodivergent, meaning that the brain functions, learns and processes information differently. Neurodivergence includes Attention Deficit Disorders, Autism, Dyslexia and Dyspraxia.

Click here to read more

It’s all about people: visit Neil Thompson’s humansolutions website

Read more

The Learning from Practice Manual

Are you involved in student supervision or other ways of helping people learn? If so, Neil Thompson’s The Learning from Practice Manual is for you. Neil has been involved in supporting practice learning for over four decades. This hands-on manual of practice guidance encapsulates his experience and expertise in a way that readers will find very helpful.

Available for purchase along with many other books by Neil here or from the Avenue Learning Centre here.

The Avenue Learning Centre Learning resources from Neil Thompson and colleagues

Read more

Neil Thompson’s Lesson for Living – Live your life

A question I have asked many individuals in one-to-one discussions and groups of people I have been working with has been: Are you living your life or is your life living you? This is not just playing with words; it is a very, very important question. It has major implications.

I have been involved in some very interesting and enlightening discussions as a result of asking that question. It has helped so many people realise that their approach to their life in so many ways is a passive one. Things happen to them; they accept them, learn to live with them; and then more things happen.

The irony of this is that we are constantly making choices, whether deliberate decisions or choices we make without even realising that we are doing so. And yet, despite all those opportunities to make changes, to move in a direction we would be happier with, so many of our choices result in maintaining the status quo, the passive life.

Click here to read more

Twitter: Follow Neil Thompson on Twitter

Read more

The Inner Level teach-in

Professors Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson explore the theories in their most recent publication, The Inner Level.

This video is aimed at activists, individuals and groups speaking publicly or delivering a presentation on the impact of inequality for individuals and society. Filmed in London in July 2018 at The Equality Trust’s annual Local Groups and Activists’ Day.

Click here to read more

Ensuring every older person is treated with dignity as a unique individual

Read more

Five things

Five Things is a collection of the five things our collaborators want you to know about life, death and everything in between. Over the next few months, we’ll be covering illness, dying, death, funerals, grief, heartache, adversity and many other topics. There’ll be a #FiveThings event in London in October 2019.

If you’d like to submit your own #FiveThings, email [email protected]

Click here to read more

It’s all about people: visit Neil Thompson’s humansolutions website

Read more

Seth Godin’s blog – Three kinds of forever

There’s the forever of discomfort. Sasha Dichter taught us about this. The feeling we get during a temporary situation that feels like it’s going to last forever.

It’s one thing to tolerate a bumpy landing on an airplane, because you know it’ll be over in ten seconds.But, a car-sick toddler doesn’t have that perspective. He’s wailing and sad because he thinks that this is the new normal, a permanent situation.

Too often, we quit in the dip. Not because we can’t tolerate discomfort for an hour, a week or a month, but because we mistakenly believe that it might last forever.

Click here to read more

A Career in Social Work: Part biography, part overview of social work careers

Read more

The Learning from Practice Manual

Are you involved in student supervision or other ways of helping people learn? If so, Neil Thompson’s The Learning from Practice Manual is for you. Neil has been involved in supporting practice learning for over four decades. This hands-on manual of practice guidance encapsulates his experience and expertise in a way that readers will find very helpful.

Available for purchase along with many other books by Neil here or from the Avenue Learning Centre here.

Stress Matters: The second edition of this important text

Read more

Neil Thompson’s Lesson for Living – Face your demons

I have many years’ experience of working with people struggling with anxiety, depression, self-doubt and related emotional challenges. In general, most of them would be thinking that there was something wrong with them, that they were deficient in some way, or even ill. They would be surprised, and generally relieved, to learn that having demons – that is, emotional challenges – is quite a normal part of being human.

We all have them, but what distinguishes those people who don’t appear to have any such demons from those who appear to be struggling with them is mainly how well we are managing them – not whether or not we have them.

At root, life is fragile, vulnerable and insecure, but for the most part we tend to be very skilled at managing the challenges all this brings and very good at supporting one another through the difficulties. At times, life will be more challenging than is generally the case – for example, when we experience a major loss and we are flooded with feelings of grief. The next major loss may be a long way off or it may be just round the corner.

Click here to read more

LinkedIn: Connect online & join Neil Thompson’s HUMANSOLUTIONS discussion group

Read more

State of the Nation report: Inequality ‘entrenched from birth’

Inequality will remain entrenched “from birth to work” unless the government takes urgent action, the Social Mobility Commission has warned.

Its State of the Nation report covering England, Scotland and Wales, said the situation had remained “virtually stagnant” since 2014.

It is calling on ministers to provide additional funding for older teenagers in education and to extend free childcare to more low income families.

The government said it would take the recommendations seriously.

Click here to read more

A fresh look at social work theory and methods

Read more

Dementia Action Week 2019

Alzheimer’s Society’s research shows that many people are worried about ‘saying the wrong thing’ to people living with dementia. And despite almost all of us knowing someone affected, two-thirds of people living with dementia report feeling isolated and lonely.

That’s why this Dementia Action Week, we’re encouraging everyone to take action by starting a conversation with someone living with dementia they know; whether it’s calling a relative with dementia or visiting a neighbour, it’s time to start talking.

We understand that it can be difficult to know what to say. But we’ve teamed up with people affected by dementia to give you the best tips for getting a conversation started.

Click here to read more

A practical guide to supervision of students & other forms of workplace learning

Read more

Homeless World Cup in Cardiff: ‘Football changed my life’

“I couldn’t be representing my country and not turning my life around at the same time,” said former heroin addict Dee Sansome.

The 38-year-old, who has been in prison and ended up on the streets for four years, reckons being picked to play for Wales in the Homeless World Cup in 2017 transformed her life forever.

“It helped me start achieving and believing in myself,” she said.

Cardiff hosts the competition in July with 500 players from 50 countries.

Click here to read more

If you’re a social worker come join us in the Social Work Focus Facebook group!

Read more

The Learning from Practice Manual

Are you involved in student supervision or other ways of helping people learn? If so, Neil Thompson’s The Learning from Practice Manual is for you. Neil has been involved in supporting practice learning for over four decades. This hands-on manual of practice guidance encapsulates his experience and expertise in a way that readers will find very helpful.

Available for purchase along with many other books by Neil here or from the Avenue Learning Centre here.

Learn with Neil Thompson: Sign up to Neil’s YouTube channel

Read more

Neil Thompson’s Lesson for Living – Believe in yourself

Something I was taught at an early age that has stood me in good stead is the idea that, if you don’t believe in yourself, you can’t expect other people to believe in you. But, there’s more to it than just believing in yourself, you also have to demonstrate your self-belief. And you also have to be prepared to question that belief from time to time. Let’s look at each of these issues.

Having self-belief means that your ‘default’ setting (that is, the stance you will automatically adopt unless something happens to change it) is one where you do not doubt yourself. You do not put yourself down; you do not tell yourself ‘I can’t do this’ (negative self-talk, to use the technical term); you do not place obstacles in the way of your own progress; and nor do you invite other people to adopt a low opinion of you (believe it or not, these are all very common behaviours, so we really do need to be tuned into them and steer well clear of them).

Click here to read more

Emotional Competence Learn to develop your emotional intelligence and resilience

Read more